Printable List of High Fiber Foods [100+ Foods]

If you’re like most Americans who fail to eat enough fiber, you are in the right place. Jump to our Printable List of High Fiber Foods.

Fiber is an essential nutrient that promotes healthy digestion, helps lower cholesterol levels, and keeps you feeling satisfied after meals. But with so many different types of fiber-rich foods available, it can be overwhelming to know where to start. 

That’s why we’ve put together a comprehensive list of over 100 high fiber foods that you can print out and use as a reference guide for your grocery shopping and meal planning. 

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the benefits of high fiber foods, the different types of fiber, and provide tips on how to incorporate more of these foods into your diet. 

So, grab a pen and paper, or fire up your printer, and let’s dive into the world of high fiber foods!

What is Fiber?

Dietary fiber is important for our health. And as previously mentioned most Americans just don’t eat enough fiber. Let’s start by talking about what fiber is and why we should eat more!

Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that our bodies cannot digest or absorb. It passes through our digestive system largely intact and plays an important role in promoting healthy digestion, regulating blood sugar levels, and reducing the risk of various health problems.

Types of Fiber

There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble. 

Soluble fiber dissolves in water and forms a gel-like substance in the gut, which can help lower cholesterol levels and regulate blood sugar levels. 

Insoluble fiber, on the other hand, does not dissolve in water and adds bulk to stool, which can help prevent constipation and promote regular bowel movements.

Recommended Fiber Intake

The recommended daily intake of fiber varies depending on age and gender. Other things to take into acount include activity level, medical conditions, and overall health.

Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for Fiber:

  • Children aged 1-3 years: 19 grams for both boys and girls
  • Children aged 4-8 years: 25 grams for both boys and girls
  • Boys aged 9-13 years: 31 grams
  • Boys aged 14-18 years: 38 grams
  • Girls aged 9-18 years: 26 grams
  • Men aged 19-50 years: 38 grams
  • Men aged 51 years and older: 30 grams
  • Women aged 19-50 years: 25 grams
  • Women aged 51 years and older: 21 grams

It is important to note that increasing fiber intake too quickly can cause digestive discomfort, such as bloating and gas. Therefore, it is recommended to gradually increase fiber intake over time and drink plenty of water to help with digestion.

If you are unsure about how much fiber you should be consuming, it is always best to consult with a registered dietitian or healthcare provider for personalized recommendations.

Health Benefits of Fiber

Fiber is important for maintaining good health because it helps keep our digestive system running smoothly, supports healthy gut bacteria, and can help reduce the risk of chronic conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. 

Eating a diet rich in high fiber foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts can help ensure that you are getting enough fiber in your diet.

Let’s dive into some of our favorite high fiber foods!

100+ High Fiber Foods

This list includes over 100 high fiber food ideas, broken down by category. 

Please note, these are just fiber estimates. Be sure to read the nutrition facts label on the individual foods you are eating. Fiber content can vary based on processing and manufacturer. 

Be sure to skip to the end to get our printable list of high fiber foods!

Fruits:

  • Guava (1 cup): 9 grams
  • Avocado (1 medium): 9 grams
  • Raspberries (1 cup): 8 grams
  • Blackberries (1 cup): 7.6 grams
  • Coconut (1 cup shredded): 7 grams
  • Persimmon (1 medium): 6 grams
  • Pear (1 medium): 6 grams
  • Pomegranate (1 medium): 5 grams
  • Papaya (1 cup): 5.5 grams
  • Apple (1 medium): 4.4 grams
  • Figs (2 figs): 3.7 grams
  • Dried apricots (1/2 cup): 3.7 grams
  • Dates (2 dates): 3.6 grams
  • Blueberries (1 cup): 3.6 grams
  • Banana (1 medium): 3.1 grams
  • Orange (1 medium): 3.1 grams
  • Prunes (3 prunes): 3 grams
  • Strawberries (1 cup): 3 grams
  • Kiwi (1 medium): 2.3 grams
  • Pineapple (1 cup): 2.3 grams
  • Mango (1 medium): 3 grams
  • Plantains (1 medium): 3 grams
  • Raisins (1/2 cup): 3 grams
  • Apricots, fresh (3 apricots): 2 grams

Vegetables:

  • Artichoke (1 medium): 10 grams
  • Acorn squash (1 cup cooked): 9 grams
  • Edamame (1 cup): 8 grams
  • Okra (1 cup cooked): 8 grams
  • Peas (1 cup): 8.8 grams
  • Collard greens (1 cup): 7.6 grams
  • Jicama (1 cup sliced): 6 grams
  • Broccoli (1 cup): 5.1 grams
  • Turnip greens (1 cup): 5 grams
  • Beet greens (1 cup): 4.2 grams
  • Brussels sprouts (1 cup): 4.1 grams
  • Carrots (1 cup): 4 grams
  • Spinach (1 cup): 4 grams
  • Sweet potato (1 medium): 4 grams
  • Potato (1 medium): 4 grams
  • Swiss chard (1 cup): 3.7 grams
  • Green beans (1 cup): 3.7 grams
  • Mustard greens (1 cup): 3 grams
  • Bell pepper (1 medium): 3 grams
  • Asparagus (1 cup): 2.8 grams
  • Kale (1 cup): 2.6 grams
  • Cauliflower (1 cup): 2.5 grams
  • Cabbage (1 cup): 2.5 grams
  • Onion (1 medium): 2 grams

Beans and Lentils:

  • Navy beans (1 cup cooked): 19 grams
  • Adzuki beans (1 cup cooked): 16.8 grams
  • Split peas (1 cup cooked): 16.3 grams
  • Lentils (1 cup cooked): 15.6 grams
  • Mung beans (1 cup cooked): 15.4 grams
  • Black beans (1 cup cooked): 15 grams
  • Pinto beans (1 cup cooked): 14 grams
  • Cranberry beans (1 cup cooked): 13.6 grams
  • Lima beans (1 cup cooked): 13.2 grams
  • Chickpeas (1 cup cooked): 12.5 grams
  • Great northern beans (1 cup cooked): 12.4 grams
  • Cannellini beans (1 cup cooked): 12.2 grams
  • Kidney beans (1 cup cooked): 11.6 grams
  • Black-eyed peas (1 cup cooked): 11.1 grams
  • Soybeans (1 cup cooked): 8 grams
  • Hummus (1/2 cup): 6 grams

Nuts and Seeds:

  • Chia seeds (1 oz or 2 tbsp): 9.8 grams
  • Hemp seeds (1 oz or 28g): 9 grams
  • Pumpkin seeds (1 oz or 28g): 5 grams
  • Poppy seeds (1 oz or 28g): 5 grams
  • Sesame seeds (1 oz or 28g): 5 grams
  • Pumpkin seed butter (2 tbsp): 4 grams
  • Almonds (1 oz or 23 nuts): 3.5 grams
  • Sunflower seeds (1 oz or 28g): 3.3 grams
  • Pistachios (1 oz or 49 nuts): 3 grams
  • Flaxseed (1 tbsp): 2.8 grams
  • Tahini (1 oz or 2 tbsp): 2.7 grams
  • Hazelnuts (1 oz or 21 nuts): 2.7 grams
  • Pecans (1 oz or 20 halves): 2.7 grams
  • Walnuts (1 oz or 14 halves): 2 grams
  • Macadamia nuts (1 oz or 10-12 nuts): 2.4 grams
  • Brazil nuts (1 oz or 6 nuts): 2.1 grams

Grains:

  • Buckwheat flour (1 cup): 12 grams
  • Chickpea flour (1 cup): 10 grams
  • Coconut flour (1/4 cup): 10 grams
  • Bulgur (1 cup cooked): 8 grams
  • Farro (1 cup cooked): 7.9 grams
  • Spelt (1 cup cooked): 7.6 grams
  • Bran flakes (1 cup): 7 grams
  • Teff (1 cup cooked): 7 grams
  • Whole wheat pasta (1 cup cooked): 6.3 grams
  • Oat bran (1/3 cup): 6 grams
  • Rice bran (1/4 cup): 6 grams
  • Barley (1 cup cooked): 6 grams
  • Amaranth (1 cup cooked): 5.2 grams
  • Quinoa (1 cup cooked): 5.2 grams
  • Psyllium husk (1 tbsp): 5 grams
  • Whole wheat pita bread (1 pita): 5 grams
  • Buckwheat (1 cup cooked): 4.5 grams
  • Oatmeal (1 cup cooked): 4 grams
  • Pumpernickel bread (1 slice): 4 grams
  • Whole grain couscous (1 cup cooked): 4 grams
  • Popcorn (3 cups): 3.6 grams
  • Brown rice (1 cup cooked): 3.5 grams
  • Ezekiel bread (1 slice): 3 grams
  • Whole wheat tortilla (1 tortilla): 2.7 grams
  • Spaghetti squash (1 cup): 2.2 grams
  • Rye bread (1 slice): 2 grams
  • Couscous (1 cup cooked): 2 grams
  • Whole wheat bread (1 slice): 2 grams

Miscellaneous:

  • Tempeh (1 cup cooked): 11 grams
  • Dark chocolate (1 oz): 3.1 grams
  • Tofu (1/2 cup): 3 grams
  • Seitan (3 oz): 3 grams
  • Nutritional yeast (1 oz): 3 grams
  • Miso (2 tbsp): 2 grams
  • Sauerkraut (1 cup): 2 grams
  • Kimchi (1/2 cup): 2 grams

High Fiber Drinks:

  • Green Smoothie (12 oz): 4-6 grams
  • Chia Seed Drink (10 oz): 5-6 grams
  • Flaxseed Smoothie (12 oz): 5-7 grams
  • Acai Berry Smoothie (12 oz): 4-6 grams
  • Psyllium husk drink (1 tbsp in water): 4 grams
  • Coconut water (8 oz.): 2.6 grams
  • Prune Juice (8 oz): 2.6 grams
  • Oat milk (8 oz.): 2 grams

Get more information on High Fiber Drinks at our sister website The Geriatric Dietitian.

Tips for Incorporating More Fiber Into Your Diet

Whew! That is a long list of high fiber foods. Now let’s talk about how to incorporate these foods into your diet.

Here are some tips for incorporating more fiber into your diet:

Eat more fruits and vegetables: 

Fruits and vegetables are naturally high in fiber, so make sure to include them in your diet. Try to eat a variety of colors and types to get a range of nutrients and fiber.

Choose whole grains: 

When selecting bread, pasta, and cereal, opt for whole-grain varieties instead of refined grains. Whole-grain options are higher in fiber and other nutrients.

Snack on nuts and seeds: 

Nuts and seeds are a great source of fiber and healthy fats. Snack on them throughout the day or add them to meals for an extra boost of fiber.

Swap out processed snacks for whole foods: 

Instead of reaching for processed snacks like chips or candy, choose whole foods like fresh fruit, vegetables, or whole-grain crackers with hummus.

Incorporate legumes: 

Legumes, such as lentils, chickpeas, and beans, are high in fiber and protein. Add them to soups, stews, salads, or enjoy as a side dish.

Use high-fiber ingredients in recipes:

Incorporate high-fiber ingredients like chia seeds, flaxseeds, or oats into recipes such as smoothies, baked goods, and oatmeal.

Final Tips:

Remember to start slowly and gradually increase your fiber intake to avoid digestive discomfort. Aim for at least 25-30 grams of fiber per day for optimal health.

Offer practical tips for increasing your daily fiber intake, such as adding more fruits and vegetables to your meals, choosing whole grains, and snacking on nuts and seeds

Printable List of High Fiber Foods- 100 Plus Foods

Printable List of High Fiber Foods

We’ve covered a lot of information in this article! Be sure to download your Printable List of High Fiber Foods. This way you can put everything you learned into place!

Use this list of high fiber foods to plan meals, make grocery lists, and get create in incorporating more fiber into your diet.

Conclusion: Printable List of High Fiber Foods

In conclusion, fiber is an essential nutrient that our bodies need for healthy digestion, regulating blood sugar levels, and reducing the risk of various health problems. 

Unfortunately, most Americans do not consume enough fiber in their diets. 

This article has provided an extensive list of over 100 high fiber foods, categorized by fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts, to help readers incorporate more fiber-rich foods into their diets. 

It is important to note that increasing fiber intake too quickly can cause digestive discomfort, and it is recommended to gradually increase fiber intake over time while staying hydrated. 

Lastly, if you are unsure about how much fiber you should be consuming, it is best to consult with a registered dietitian or healthcare provider for personalized recommendations.

Learn more about all things fiber at the blog on High Fiber Central.

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